‘Puss in Boots: The Last Wish’ review: A wonderfully entertaining animated adventure

Having exhausted eight of his nine lives, Puss in Boots (Antonio Banderas) is now hunted by a wolf bounty hunter (Wagner Moura) who is bent on ending the righteous legend once and for all. A fallen star crashes in the middle of the dark forest, and whoever finds it gets what he wants. Puss sets out on an adventure to reclaim his former glory as a hero, but unfortunately for him, he’s not the only one who has his claws in passing on this wish.

Puss in Boots (Antonio Banderas) in DreamWorks Animation’s Puss in Boots: The Last Wish, directed by Joel Crawford.

the a partner The franchise is muddled at best. Fantastic first movie Partner 2 decent while third partner And the partner forever after Just drain Swamp Tired Ogre for everything he’s worth.

General disappointment with where the franchise has headed in subsequent sequels has dampened the desire to see 2011 Puss in Boots Movie. However, it might be worth a visit now since Puss in Boots: Last Wish It is absolutely amazing and the best animated movie of the year.

Directed by Joel Crawford and Januel Mercado (The Croods: A New Age(With a story by Tommy Swerdlow)Greenwich) and Tom Wheeler (Puss in Boots(and screenplay by Paul Fisher)Lego Ninjago movie) and Tommy Swerdlow, Puss in Boots: Last Wish He has a cartoon style that’s drastically different from the realistic style you’d associate him with a partner And the Puss in Boots.

Take advantage of radical perspectives, action sequences that slow down to emphasize key strikes before speeding up again, and different frame rates to give characters and enemies unique moves, Puss in Boots: Last Wish Visually similar to the likes Spider-Man Into the Spider-Verse And the the wicked.

Kitty Soft-Paws (Salma Hayek), Perito (Harvey Gillen) and Puss in Boots (Antonio Banderas) in “Puss in Boots: The Last Wish.” Directed by Joel Crawford and Januel Mercado. © Universal Pictures

The movie is basically a race for the star to see who can get the wish first. Boss is accompanied by a cat named Kitty Soft Paws (Salma Hayek). Their troubled past keeps them in constant conflict. When Puss retires briefly as a champ, he meets a therapy dog ​​named Perrito (Harvey Guillen) who is now convinced they are the best of friends, is happy with everything, and doesn’t want to wish for anything.

Standing in the way of the Boss and his desires are criminal masterminds Goldilocks (Florence Pugh), Papa Bear (Ray Winston), Mama Bear (Olivia Colman), Little Bear (Samson Kayo) and relentless magic-obsessed Jack Horner (John Mulaney).

Baby Bear (Samson Kayo), Papa Bear (Ray Winstone), Mama Bear (Olivia Colman), and Goldilocks (Florence Pugh) in “Puss in Boots: The Last Wish.” Directed by Joel Crawford and Januel Mercado. © Universal Pictures

Such as a partnerAnd the Puss in Boots: Last Wish Playing with being more adults than the average animated movie. visually dark sometimes with red and orange flashes and close encounters with death sometimes, last wish It also handles more mature dialogue with both “crap” and “hell” muttered on at least one occasion and the child being referred to as a “dingleberry”.

Perito also gets sleepy with his heavy use of vulgarity. One of his most memorable sequences is when a long row of whistles hides his insults about the Three Bears.

Perito (Harvey Gillen) in DreamWorks Animation’s Puss in Boots: The Last Wish, directed by Joel Crawford.

Hearing John Mulaney as a villain in any movie, animated or otherwise, is a little weird and takes some getting used to. Mulaney is no stranger to animation on a regular basis big mouth and as the voice of Chip in this year’s Disney+ exclusive Chip and Dale: Rescue Rangers. But this is the first time that Mulaney hasn’t over-amplified his voice in that nasal tone you’d expect from Andrew Glauberman or even Mulaney’s own attitude.

Mulaney is much more relaxed here as Jack Horner, which makes his outbursts of anger even more unsettling. Bits of comedy still drip through Horner’s dialogue, but the character is mostly heartless, and Mulaney gives an amazing performance to match.

(From left) Ethical Bug (Kevin McCann) and Jack Horner (John Mulaney) in DreamWorks Animation’s Puss in Boots: The Last Wish, directed by Joel Crawford.

Guillermo del Toro Pinocchio Explore a familiar story with a different concept; The wooden boy never wanted to be human. Pinocchio is the only character in the movie who is not controlled by strings.

In a conceptually similar way, Puss in Boots: Last Wish Dive into loving the life you have and appreciating each day as if it were your last instead of relying on the desire to make everything better for you.

Wolf (Wagner Moura) in DreamWorks Animation’s, “Puss in Boots: The Last Wish,” directed by Joel Crawford. © Universal Pictures

While the humor is often laugh-out-loud, Puss actually goes through some pretty intense character development over the course of this. last wish. It matures and goes in an unexpected direction.

The way the film reopens for future installments is ingenious in a way that doesn’t feel like an obvious sequel bait, either.

Puss in Boots (Antonio Banderas) in DreamWorks Animation’s Puss in Boots: The Last Wish, directed by Joel Crawford.

verdict

Puss in Boots: Last Wish Sleek and fun with stylish animation, a gripping adventure story, off-the-wall humor, and great writing crafted in a way that rejuvenates what was thought of as a dead CGI animation franchise.

‘Puss in Boots: The Last Wish’ review: A wonderfully entertaining animated adventure

Positives

  • Comedy that lands with kids and adults.
  • Eye-catching animation
  • The wolf is legit badass

cons

  • Comparisons to the Spider-Verse are inevitable
  • John Mulaney’s more serious tone takes some getting used to

9final total

Reader rating: (0 votes)

0.0


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